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Home » Eyeglasses & Contacts » Contact Lenses

Contact Lenses

contacts eye close up woman 1280x853We offer a wide selection of contact lenses including disposable soft contact, bifocal/multifocal, toric, and colored lenses. Whether you wear daily, weekly or monthly disposables, or conventional (vial) lenses, check out our selection of lenses that fit your needs.

A good contact lens fit starts with a thorough eye exam to ensure the most up-to-date prescription and rule out any pre-existing conditions that could interfere with contact lens wear.

We will determine the best fitting lens based on your lifestyle needs and the shape and health of your eye. In most cases, you’ll have the opportunity to try lenses on the same day as your exam. You can even go home with a few samples before making a final decision.

We follow up the initial fitting and then make any necessary changes in fit or materials to get you the best possible fit. We teach all our patients proper contact lens care and also possible consequences if proper care is not taken. Then we continue with long-term follow-up to monitor the condition of the lenses and to ensure that proper hygiene is being maintained.

Learn more about the contact lens lines that we carry.

  • Acuvue
  • Bausch & Lomb
  • CooperVision
  • CibaVision

The Importance of a Comprehensive Eye Exam

Whether or not you have vision problems, it is important to have your eyes checked regularly to ensure they are healthy and that there are no signs of a developing eye condition. A comprehensive eye exam will check the general health of your eyes as well as the quality of your vision. During this exam the eye doctor will determine your prescription for eyeglasses, however this prescription alone is not sufficient for contact lenses. The doctor may also check for any eye health issues that could interfere with the comfort and success of contact lens wear.

Contact Lens Fitting

One size does not fit all when it comes to contact lenses. Your eye doctor will need to take some measurements to properly fit your contact lenses. Contact lenses that do not fit properly could cause discomfort, blurry vision or even damage the eye. Here are some of the measurements your eye doctor will take for a contact lens fitting: Corneal Curvature, Pupil or Iris Size, Tear Film Evaluation, Contact Lens Trial and Prescription.

Scleral Lenses Are Really Big News!

Scleral lenses are a specialized contact lenses that make contact lens use possible for many people for the first time – and they have advantages for normal contact lens wearers as well.

A scleral lens is a larger lens that rests on the sclera or white of the eye, rather than the colored portion (or iris). The lens has many advantages which can make contact lens wear an option for those who have previously been told otherwise.

The lens, which covers a larger area than a normal contact lens, creates a pocket filled with artificial tears, fitting securely around the eye. Due to their size, scleral lenses provide sharper vision, greater durability, easier handling and a lower risk for complications.

We have a unique library of scleral contact lens solutions for you.

Are you one of the 5 patient types that would likely benefit from a scleral lens?

Candidates Include Patients with:

  1. Allergies
  2. High or complicated prescriptions that have been told they can’t wear contact lenses.
  3. Unsuccessful history with other lenses either due to poor comfort or poor vision.
  4. Keratoconus or any type of corneal degeneration or dystrophy, transplants, scarring or trauma or post-LASIK complications.
  5. Dry eyes or high sensitivity to light or Steve Johnson Syndrome.

What are the 5 main benefits of a scleral lens vs. a regular lens?

  1. Easier to insert and remove.
  2. Improved, consistent quality of vision all day long.
  3. Better comfort. Other lenses may dry out and get uncomfortable.
  4. Longer lasting. With proper maintenance, they can last over a year.

What are three key differences in the scleral lens technology?

  1. The lens doesn’t touch the cornea but rests on the sclera or the white part of the eye to increase comfort.
  2. Microscopic adjustments to the lenses can be made with new advanced manufacturing technology to customize the fit of each lens to each patient’s unique needs.
  3. Can add highly customized, unique prescriptions onto each lens to provide even better vision.

Special Instances That Benefit from Scleral Lenses

Sports &Recreation:

Scleral lenses are great for athletes who require excellent acuity and a stable lens fit while they are physically active.

They are also useful in situations where other contact lens types are not effective or appropriate, including dusty environments and contact sports.

Legal Blindnes

It is not uncommon for someone who is legally blind from a corneal irregularity to regain great vision.

This lens design provides a protective cushion of saline that can reduce pain and photosensitivity caused by other lens designs.

Protective & Therapeutic:

Scleral lenses can provide hydration to the cornea in severe cases of dry eye and ocular pemphigoid.

They can also help in keeping the eye hydrated in conditions where the eyelids do not close properly such as facial nerve palsy, trauma, or ptosis.

We Specialize in Bifocal and Multifocal lenses

glasses senior man hat bw

If you are over 40 and have difficulty seeing close up, you probably have a common age-related condition called presbyopia which is when the eye’s natural lens loses the ability to focus on close objects. Presbyopia is a natural process as the eye ages and affects the majority of people from age 40 and upward.  Individuals with presbyopia are often familiar with the need to hold reading materials such as newspapers an arm’s length away from their eyes in order to see clearly, yet reading glasses with bifocal or multifocal (progressive) lenses can help.

Fortunately for those who don’t like the look, feel or inconvenience of reading glasses, there is another option. Bifocal and multifocal lenses are also available in contact lenses in both soft and Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) varieties.

Multifocal contact lenses give you added freedom over glasses and they allow you to be able to view any direction - up, down and to the sides - with similar vision. People wearing progressive lenses in glasses on the other hand have to look over their glasses if they want to view upwards or into the distance. We sell all major brands.

The Difference Between Bifocal and Multifocal Lenses

Just as the name indicates, bifocal lenses are divided into two distinct segments for different vision powers, the first for distance vision and the second for near vision.  This enables you to clearly switch your focus from near to far as needed, but your vision will not necessarily be clear in between. The term multifocal lenses can refer to any lenses with multiple powers including bifocals, trifocals or progressive lenses. Non-bifocal multifocal lenses have a range of powers that enable you to constantly adjust your focus to see clearly from up close to far and in between.

Multifocal contact lenses are generally designed in one of two ways, as either simultaneous vision lenses or alternating vision lenses.

Simultaneous vision lenses

The most popular version of multifocal contact lenses, simultaneous vision lenses present the distance and near vision zones of the lens at the same time.  Typically after a short adjustment period your eyes learn to utilize the segment of the lens that they need to focus on the desired object and essentially ignore the other.

They come in two designs:

  • Concentric ring design: In the most basic form these are bifocal lenses that are comprised of a central circular area of one power with a ring around of the alternate power, similar to a bulls-eye.  In this design the power of the rings (either near or distance vision is interchangeable).  For intermediate viewing (18-24 inches away) extra rings can be added to create a trifocal or multifocal lens.  The width of each ring is variable depending on the power that is needed most and the edges of the rings can be blended for a smooth transition of focus, similar to progressive eyeglass lenses.
  • Aspheric design: These multifocal lenses attempt to provide a natural vision experience by blending many lens powers across the surface and center of the lens. In this design both distance and near vision power are located in the central visual area and your eyes will adapt to focus on the area needed to view what you are looking at.

An Alternative Option to Multifocal Contact Lenses: Monovision

Monovision is another contact lens alternative for presbyopia particularly if you are having difficulty adapting to multifocal lenses.  Monovision splits your distance and near vision between your eyes, using your dominant eye for distance vision and your non-dominant  eye for near vision.

Typically you will use single vision lenses in each eye however sometimes the dominant eye will use a single vision lens while a multifocal lens will be used in the other eye for intermediate and near vision. This is called modified monovision.  Your eye doctor will perform a test to determine which type of lens is best suited for each eye and optimal vision.